Through History’s Lens / Clouded or Clear – Looking Back at the 2020 Election(Virtual Talk – Online Zoom)

Event details

  • Tuesday | November 10, 2020
  • 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
  • Virtual event - Zoom online
  • 803-728-7056

Cost: Free

Through History’s Lens / Clouded or Clear – Looking Back at the 2020 Election, presented by Hon. Charles B. Schudson

What happened? Who happened? Are we still counting votes? Are we in the courts? We’ve barely recovered … isn’t this the last thing we want to talk about? But we can’t stop – it’s so confusing, and interesting … and important! So trying to make some sense of it all, let’s get some help from history.

Through history’s lens – clouded or clear – let’s see what made a difference: voter suppression … foreign interference … climate change … immigration … electoral college … pandemic? With help from a presidential election historian, we’ll ask whether America has ever experienced a presidential election anything like this last one … whether this, indeed, may be our last one (and, if not, why so many were so worried that it might be). We’ll try to answer history’s questions: “Now (or once the votes are counted), where do we stand … and are we still standing?”

Please register in advance for this FREE Online event since enrollment is limited to 50 participants. If you have any questions, please email: athenschau@gmail.com

Click HERE TO register

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMlcuCtrjMpEtPpFTdWpNeDkyqvg_jXwoKY


This event is sponsored by Athens Chautauqua in collaboration with Greenville Chautauqua.

Charles B. Schudson is a Wisconsin Reserve Judge Emeritus and law professor. A graduate of Dartmouth College and the Wisconsin Law School, he served as a state and federal prosecutor, a trial and appellate judge, and Fulbright Scholar teaching at law schools abroad. He has been a featured guest on NPR, PBS, and Oprah, and is the author of many published works including, Independence Corrupted / How Americas Judges Make Their Decisions (University of Wisconsin Press, 2018) a nominee for the Chautauqua Prize and National Book Award.